What does it mean to be LGBTI in 2017?

Afsar Syed Mohammad, Senior Technical Specialist, Gender Equality, Diversity and ILOAIDS

Neline M., who works for an American multinational company in Geneva, Switzerland, considers herself lucky to be working for a company that does not discriminate against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) employees. After her partner was transferred to Geneva, she informed her HR manager about her relationship and requested a transfer to Geneva. Her company accepted the request under its “dual career” policy, which acknowledges LGBTI couples.
More companies, and many governments, could do a better job improving the laws, policies and working conditions for LGBTI employees, studies find.

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12 things we learned at the International Labour Conference

Martin Murphy, Director of Communications and Public Information

Martin Murphy, ILO Director of Communications and Public Information (a.i). @martinmurphyilo

As part of our coverage of the 105th Session of the International Labour Conference, we sat down with experts on a whole range of topics to look at some of the biggest issues facing the world of work. These talks were broadcast live to an audience of thousands of people worldwide, who shared their thoughts and questions with our experts. Here’s a short list of some of the things that we learned.

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“There are no jobs on a dead planet”

Guy Ryder, Director-General of the International Labour Organization

Guy Ryder, Director-General of the International Labour Organization

To mark this year’s World Day for Decent Work, trade unions have chosen the theme of climate change, urging governments to move now to create prosperity for all on a sustainable planet. This focus comes in the wake of the UN Climate Change Summit last month, where again and again, I heard political and business leaders issuing a similar call and making the link between decent jobs and sustainability.

We inhabit a time marked by the highest levels of inequality in living memory. Growing job insecurity is a reality for many, especially the world’s 1.2 billion working poor. Climate change is destroying jobs and livelihoods in every corner of the planet.

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