New lives, new freedoms – how labour migration empowers Nepali women

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Neha Choudhary, ILO Kathmandu
National project coordinator,
ILO Integrated programme on Fair Recruitment (FAIR)

When I first met Ram Kumari Chaudhary, she was an extremely shy, but solemn, 19-year-old. She told me she wanted to go to work in Jordan to support her parents, adding that there were few opportunities to find a decent job in Nepal. Soon afterwards, in 2017, I learned that she had found a job in Jordan’s booming garment industry, earning, on average, around US$350 a month. Every three or four months she faithfully sent back about three-quarters of her salary to her parents in Nepal. Continue reading

I benefitted from migration, let others do so too

Naren Prasad, ILO Senior Economist, RESEARCH

Naren Prasad, ILO Senior Economist, RESEARCH

I come from a family of migrants. In the early 1900s, the British colonial authorities brought both of my great-grandfathers from Utter Pradesh in India to Fiji as indentured labourers. Life was considerably tougher for them than it ever has been for me. I can’t imagine how they and many thousands of others coped working endless hours in the sugarcane fields. Continue reading

What happened when I left university with the wrong skills

Delila Kidanu, ThinkYoung

Delila Kidanu, ThinkYoung

Like many newly-minted graduates before me, I realized very quickly after leaving university that the types of jobs available to me were not as plentiful as those for friends who had studied science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) subjects.

I learned the hard way how important it is to have the skills that employers are looking for. Continue reading