What’s it like to get tested for HIV at work?

HIV/AIDS and the World of Work Branch (ILOAIDS)

The ILO is the lead UN-agency on HIV workplace policies and programmes and private-sector mobilization. ILOAIDS is the branch dedicated to this issue.

The world has made tremendous strides in the fight against HIV over the past several years. In most of the world, new infections are down, the average life expectancy of people living with HIV is up and we have good reason to think that 2030 could be the year we declare victory over AIDS.

But that doesn’t mean we can let our guard down. There are still around 35 million people in the world infected with the virus and one in two of them don’t know it.

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Farm workers walk a fine line between exploitation and forced labour

Dennis Zulu Chief Program Officer

Beate Andrees is Head of ILO’s Special Action Programme to Combat Forced Labour. You can follow her on Twitter at @beateandrees

Tomatoes were once grown by indigenous people in the Andes and then exported to Europe and North America by Spanish colonizers. And while the delicious fruit has found a home in many parts of the world, many of the workers who pick it have not. Many are irregular immigrants, tolerated because they provide cheap labour, but not welcomed.

One of the most prolific tomato growing regions is the state of Florida in the United States, the area focused on by film director Sanjay Rawal and actress/producer Eva Longoria in their film Food Chains. It tells the story of a group of courageous migrant farm workers resisting their exploitation.

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On the Road to Ending HIV

Alice Ouedraogo

Alice Ouedraogo is Chief of the HIV/AIDS Programme at the International Labour Organization

Heavy trucks pass through the Chirundu Corridor, one of the major routes connecting Zimbabwe and Zambia in southern Africa. This is a vital transport artery, important for the economies of both countries and their neighbors. It is also a major route for the transmission of HIV.

The mix of long-distance lorry drivers — who go weeks at a time without seeing their families — with widespread poverty existing along the corridor, results in sexual encounters between drivers and women. The risks they take with their health have an impact on the wider community.

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